Emergency Insurance With Medical Coverage – 5 Travel Insurance Must-Haves

Travel insurance is something that often gets lost in the shuffle when people start planning for a trip abroad. When it comes to planning such an exciting trip, it is just no fun to think about all of the “what-if” questions, such as, “What if I fall ill or get into an accident while on my trip?” No, it’s a lot more fun to stick to booking your air reservations, making hotel arrangements, and deciding which points of interest you will be visiting.

Still, the savvy traveler knows that their trip will be that much easier to enjoy if they have already made provisions for all of those “what-if” questions ahead of time. In addition to just making smart choices about where to visit and what you will do once you arrive, the best way to buy yourself peace of mind before you travel is through the purchase of travel medical insurance.

Of course, one of the worst-case scenarios that could happen to you while you are traveling abroad is to encounter some sort of an emergency situation. This could be something as common as being involved in a car accident or something as exotic as being bit by a snake or falling off of a cliff.

So, before you embark on your exciting journey, you will want to invest in a very good travel medical insurance policy. When you do, make sure that your policy has a provision for emergency situations.

If you are looking for emergency insurance with medical coverage, here are 5 travel insurance must-haves:

1. Emergency medical evacuation:

Make sure that the policy you buy has you covered for emergency medical evacuation. For example, say you are in a remote part of Italy and you get injured, but the local medical facilities there are not sufficient to treat you. You may need to be evacuated to a larger city in order to receive the treatment you need.

2. Transportation to a local hospital:

Similarly, you will need to make sure that there is a provision for your transportation to a local hospital. Even if you do not require something as extreme as emergency medical evacuation by helicopter, you will almost certainly require transport to a local hospital via ambulance.

3. Repatriation for continued treatment in your home country:

Another policy provision that is wise to ask about: getting repatriated so that you can receive continued treatment at home. This can become necessary if your injury is severe enough to require an extended hospital stay, specialized treatment, or long-term rehabilitation.

4. Loss of checked luggage:

Emergency situations often involve the loss or misplacement of luggage. It is wise to select a policy that will cover you not only for the loss of your luggage, but that will also pay for any incidentals in order to help you get by while you await your luggage reimbursement.

5. Return of mortal remains:

In the extremely-remote chance that you were to die while traveling abroad, you would have done your family a great service by purchasing a policy with a provision for the return of your mortal remains to your home country. It makes no sense to put your loved ones in the position of having to arrange to get your remains sent home during what would be a very difficult time in their lives.

Consider these 5 travel insurance must-haves as you invest in emergency insurance with medical coverage for your next trip.

The Shuffle – A Different Kind of iPod

The iPod Shuffle is a step in a whole new direction with micro MP3 players. They’ve just never gotten this small, like the newest iPod shuffle. This is mainly because of better chips from Apple that do more with less space. Traditionally, you always had to give up something when you chose a smaller sized version of anything electronic. That’s not really true anymore. Another model from Apple that follows this same principle is the iPod Nano. This MP3 player is almost as thin as a credit card, but still has plenty of space for your music, and a great battery.

People have always wanted to carry their music around, whether they listened to it while traveling or not. We had tape players, “Walkmans,” and decades later we had the first round of MP3 players, which were a joke. They were big and bulky, often had no screen, lights, or any way to tell you what song you were on. The biggest joke of them all was actually an enormous sized one, heavy and made of metal, from a boutique audio brand, which had an on/off switch, but no other way to tell if the unit was on. Storage also left a lot to be desired.

The iPod Shuffle is such of a night and day difference from those old models. Size isn’t the only thing people consider, although with this model it plays a major role. When you put the iPod Shuffle next to other MP3 players that have been dubbed “small,” the iPod wins out in pretty much every area. Other MP3 brands make you rely on buying batteries, external media like cards and memory sticks, and generally won’t play your music for that long. The iPod’s battery is a built in lithium-ion batter, the same kinds they use for the best cell phones on the market. Most users say their iPod shuffle plays hours of music for them, before needing a recharge. The iPod storage is also built-in. All you do is sync it up with your computer and download all of the songs through the USB port.

Apple also put out numerous other models of the iPod. Features that the shuffle doesn’t have are video playback, photos, or mainly anything graphical. The iPod Shuffle is geared towards those who are only interested in the audio, and want a micro solution. The shuffle has become so small that it can clip onto basically anything and go unnoticed. The reputation of the iPod Shuffle before was that it couldn’t play the songs in the order you wanted to, since its “random play” function was always on. Now, today’s model lets you turn that random “shuffle” mode on or off.

Apple isn’t the only choice you have if you’re looking for a small MP3 player, but most people go with the iPod because there are so many clear advantages. They don’t just make one product, like so many do. They’ll release five different versions, each intended for people with different interests, and different ways of life. Take the ipod nano [http://www.ipods-mania.com/ipod-nano.html], for instance. Apple also releases a range of storage options for their models. You’re not locked into buying the most expensive version with all this extra storage if you don’t need it. It’s pretty obvious why Apple is the leader in MP3 players everywhere in the world.

Healthcare, Air Travel and Interoperability

The healthcare industry is notorious for its severely disconnected practices. Often, a patient finds herself caught in the middle of the shuffle. If you’ve recently received medical care or attempted to schedule a doctor’s visit, you are certainly familiar with the headaches associated with the process. The article “If Air Travel worked like Health Care” from the National Journal, accurately and humorously sums up the issues we face.

As a patient, interacting with the healthcare industry feels overwhelming and disconnected. Unfortunately, we are forced to tolerate a high level of absurdity when trying to complete relatively simple tasks. As a consumer, we would rarely accept such circumstances in any other industry, but it seems when it comes to healthcare, we have limited recourse. Patients seeking care face repetitive lines of questioning and seemingly unending wait times as the entire industry suffers from a lack of interoperability.

The patient in the National Journal article, after being sold a flight departing months past his desired travel date, after he is required to fax in a consent form, and after he must call a separate company to handle his baggage, informs the customer service representative that in a modern system, he would be sold “a safe round-trip journey, instead a series of separate procedures. It would have back-office personnel using modern IT systems to coordinate my journey behind the scenes. The systems and personnel would talk to each other automatically. At the press of a button, once I entered a password, they would be able to look up my travel history. We’d do most of this stuff online.” He’s describing the way most industries operate today, from air travel to banking to freight transportation, all of which are able to successfully communicate between systems, companies and types of data.

This article highlights, in a light-hearted way, the tension created by trying to coordinate answers to simple questions like appointment scheduling or billing inquiries while on the phone with a provider or health plan. All the healthcare stakeholders, patients, providers and health plans, are frustrated by the lack of interoperability and the high administrative costs to accomplish simple tasks like scheduling an appointment.

Providing healthcare in this disconnected manner is expensive and unsustainable. As we look to the future, health systems and health communications will need to be integrated across IT systems, providers, specialist offices, labs and health plans. Data will need to be mobile, secure and efficient. It will need to be accessible when and where it’s required by authorized personnel.